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The ecological processes behind one of the world’s most popular beverages

You drink it everyday. It’s black. It smells good.


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Photo by Nathan Dumlao on Unsplash

Planting trees among fields of crops like coffee is not new. Before the green revolution and the global intensification of agricultural systems to feed a growing population intercropping various species of plants was the rule.


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Photo by Rafael Rocha on Unsplash

Watching oil palm expansion

Oil palm ecology and botany

The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is a tropical palm from West Africa and is native in eight countries: Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Uganda. The oil palm now grows throughout the tropics in Africa, South and Central America as well as Asia and Oceania. Oil palm thrives under warm temperatures, 25–35 deg. C, and high rainfall, 2000–3000 mm a year.


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Today’s plants won’t survive forever. Here’s how we’re growing plants for the future.

Eight billion people make for a lot of mouths to feed — a lot of rice, corn, and wheat. Which are the most cultivated and consumed crops around the globe.


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Photo by Nathan Dumlao on Unsplash

Coffee is appreciated by millions of drinkers everyday around the world. Around 25 million farmers grow coffee in 60 tropical countries. Coffee plantation covers about 11 million ha around the world including both arabica and robusta coffee.


Trading coffee is not an easy job. In a recent trip to Vietnam, I had the chance to meet a coffee trader and visit his wet mill.


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Two solutions to save your cup of coffee from climate change.

Imagine that you are struggling to find water during the dry season, from October to April. Imagine that every year, the dry season is longer and drier because of climate change. Now, imagine that you cannot move to get water because you are a coffee plant.


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When you need water but you cannot move: the big problem that all plants face.

A drought is a natural event in certain regions of the world where it is the consequence of the cycles of Earth around the sun.


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First we learned the world was round. Now we’re learning how to flatten it.

For millennia, humans believed that the Earth was flat.

Thuận Sarzynski

SDG Warrior, World Citizen, Capitalist Hippie, Scientist, Polyglot, Storyteller, Writer, Earthling, Tree Hugger, Food Lover, Adoptee & Otaku

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